Tagged Animated

Ralph Breaks the Internet (Moore & Johnston, 2018)

There is a lot going on in Ralph Breaks the Internet outside of its family-friendly messaging about learning to let go of your insecurities and, by extension, the people you’re close to when it’s time for them to move on. In and of itself, that messaging is astute and worth championing in a film like this. The fact that…

The 2019 Oscar-Nominated Shorts: Animated (Various, 2017-2018)

Animal Behaviour (Snowden & Fine, 2018) This starts off cute enough, as much as the pairing of disorders with animals is painfully on-the-nose. The leech has separation anxiety! The praying mantis is bad at relationships! Et cetera. There’s not much of an attempt to be clever, which is what I was hoping for. Unfortunately, the…

Mirai (Mamoru, 2018)

This is quite the shocking development for me, since I truly thought Mirai was going to be my deserving underdog for the Oscar this year. It’s hard not to root for Japanese anime whenever it’s nominated. It’s usually of much better quality than what the American studios have to offer. But all those nominees were from Studio…

Incredibles 2 (Bird, 2018)

I’m very fond of the first Incredibles film, and by and large, its sequel is a welcome return. The characters are much the same as we’ve left them, as are their voice actors. Their personalities continue to shine through. Bird’s action sets remain dazzling, full of force and verve that keeps you entertained. And, in a bit…

Night is Short, Walk on Girl (Masaaki, 2017)

I commend the gutsy animation style on display in Night is Short, Walk on Girl. Expression is maximized from stem to stern, with emotions and physical movements taking on eye-popping (and hilarious) modes. Over-exaggerating affect and spatial boundaries works in this context, because this is a film about those awkward in-between years of adolescence and adulthood—between…

Loving Vincent (Kobiela & Welchman, 2017)

It takes a bit of time to get used to the animation of Loving Vincent, hand painted as it is in the style of van Gogh’s artworks. Overhead shots of towns and fields, and any fast or abrupt movement in general, cannot really be captured with much grace through this technique, so there are a few…

Paddington 2 (King, 2017)

We are lucky to have a film so pure, so in tune with what is right and decent, and so hugely entertaining as Paddington 2 is. I remember being similarly enchanted by the first film, despite initially writing it off as an innocuous kiddie flick before the great reviews convinced me to give it a go. Back…

The Boss Baby (McGrath, 2017)

There’s a clever concept here. The story has an anti-capitalist bent, revealing the exhausting impact of mass commoditization and empty corporate hierarchies. In such a culture, there is no time—nay, no room for the nuclear family, and what is sacrificed is love for speedy profit and gain. The human touch replaced by the synthetic, marketed decoy (new…

The Wolf House (Cociña & León, 2018)

I don’t know all that much about the Chilean cult that haunts The Wolf House. A cursory search reveals far more than I want to know, with atrocity after atrocity being unveiled like stepping stones. It’s enough to churn your stomach. The directors of this stop-motion phantasmagoria don’t tackle this subject matter head-on, choosing instead to…

The Breadwinner (Twomey, 2017)

The thing I most admire about The Breadwinner is the fact that it doesn’t end on a tidy note. I found that commendable. It shows a lot of maturity to avoid the customary scene of hugs and tears after a plot that deals with so much separation and pain. Instead, it leaves it up to us to…

Ferdinand (Saldanha, 2017)

Ferdinand is a difficult film to dislike, what with its sympathetic hero and the colourful characters supporting his journey. I quite like its firm stance against the barbaric spectacle of bullfighting, and if you dig deeper, Ferdinand’s gentleness and unwillingness to be a fighting bull could be interpreted through a queer lens. He knows he’s…

Isle of Dogs (Anderson, 2018)

It’s hard to articulate just why Isle of Dogs came up short for me. The backlash regarding the translation/non-translation dynamic of the Japanese dialogue is worth contemplating, though since this is a polemic from the eyes of Othered victims, the language barrier seems a natural obstacle that would crop up (just as, you know, dogs don’t understand English and…

Christopher Robin (Forster, 2018)

The nostalgia factor on this one is high. I, like many other children, grew up on Winnie the Pooh. I watched the full-length movies, the cartoons, and I’m pretty sure I had a stuffed Pooh as a toy. Strangely, though, I wasn’t too enthused with this new film at first sight, as it seemed a…